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Mitch Rolsky
Mitch Rolsky - REALTOR®

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Houses vs Condos

While some housing developments and neighborhoods have monthly, quarterly or annual fees typically less than 15$/month of the fee is actually paid to the management firm itself. While some might consider this wasted dollars there is a benefit to you as an owner not having to deal with selecting and supervising contractors to do work on the property etc.

 

While entrance ways and common area maintenance would typically also be included these are real costs that hopefully include both ongoing maintenance and a capital reserve funding that will cover landscape replacement and structure replacement for things like clubhouses, tennis courts, private streets or parking lots, tennis courts etc.  These items actually add to the value of the property and literally you as an owner within the development will own your percentage of these common areas and amenities and will pay a portion of the care for these items.

 

The other portion of the HOA fees is related to your specific home, regardless if it’s a condo or a house. This could include things like exterior painting, landscape maintenance, snow removal, repairs etc. These costs are also real costs and while you as an owner might be able to do some of these items yourself vs. pay to have them completed this is the only real difference. In fact the combined buying power associated with an HOA contracting for house painting for an entire neighborhood could result in a lower cost than what you as an individual owner would have to pay.

 

For many paying an amount each month, into the reserve fun that covers your individual home or condo, is what causes the most frustration. However you should view the HOA reserve fund as a forced savings account. This insures that when the time comes to paint the home or replace the roof that the dollars will exist to fund the project.  Just like you would own a portion of the common areas you also will own your percentage of the reserve fund. When it comes time to sell the property having your portion of the reserve dollars is just as valuable as a great floor plan, finishes or a stellar location.

 What Property Type is best for you and lifestyle may be as simple as do you own the land itself. This single item impacts what the owner is responsible for in the way of repairs & maintenance which drives the amount of  any HOA fees associated with the property.

Single-Family Houses are the most typical style of property outside of urban areas. The house is an individual, freestanding, unattached structure typically built on a lot larger than the structure itself that results in yard surrounding the house.  Buyers own the lot the house is built on and are responsible for everything to do with the land itself as well as the interior and exterior of the house.

 

Owner owns the land the house is built on – Yes

Owner is Typically Responsible for Maintenance & Repair of the following Items: 100% of the lot and House including all interior components like decorating, upgrades, repairs and maintenance of the floor coverings, drywall/ceiling repair, painting, cabinetry and tile work in kitchen and baths, bathroom fixtures, kitchen appliances, all mechanical systems including the air conditioning, furnace, water heater, water softener, sump pump, insulation, light fixtures and electrical wiring and plumbing, telephone wiring, fireplace and all doors, windows, stairway railings etc.

 

All exterior maintenance and repair including painting, siding and brick, gutters and the chimney roof repairs/replacement, garage doors etc.

 

All structural and foundation repairs or maintenance

 

All Landscape and hardscaping items like lawns, sprinkler systems, trees, shrubs, flowers, retaining walls, decks, patios, fences, water features, driveways, sidewalks, drainage issues, snow removal etc.

 

Typical Association Fees Related to this Property

Association fees with this type of property are typically related to neighborhood or development amenities and do not have to do with the individual home itself. Fees could range from fifty dollars each year to deal with neighborhood entry ways at the low end up to several hundred dollars each month based on features like neighborhood pools, clubhouses, tennis courts, lakes, golf courses as well as street or sidewalk repair and snow removal if privately owned

 

Pros of This Type of Property

Increased privacy and typically less contact with neighbors unless involved in neighborhood functions of your choosing. Greater ability to make aesthetic and other decisions that affect the exterior of your property although many neighborhoods have covenants that owners must follow along with city zoning requirements. Owners are not required to maintain a rainy-day reserve fund to cover the future ongoing repairs and maintenance like painting or replacement of the roof when needed. Owners decide if they want to deal with routine repairs and maintenance like mowing the lawn themselves or hiring a contractor.

 

Cons of This Type of Property

Typically less contact with neighbors unless involved in neighborhood functions. No mandated reserve fund to pull from when surprise repairs and expenses occur nor to cover planned repairs and maintenance. Expenses like roof repair, painting etc. are greater due to the loss of volume buying power. You must find, negotiate and supervise all contractors dealing with interior and exterior of the house itself. Real estate taxes and insurance costs are generally higher than for a comparable condominium property.

 

Neighbors tend to pay less attention to activity occurring with neighbors homes like crime, vandalism etc.

 

Zero-Lot-Line Home – Typical zero lot line homes appear visually to be a single-family detached homes. But the actual lot boundaries coincide with the exact exterior perimeter of the structure itself and the yard that surrounds the home is co-owned in common with the rest of the residents of the community or development.

 

With this style property there is usually a legal easement that allows the owner of the property to access the home by crossing over common areas in the form of driveways and sidewalks

 

Owner owns the land the house is built on – Yes

Owner is Typically Responsible for Maintenance & Repair of the following Items: 100% of the lot and House including all interior components like decorating, upgrades, repairs and maintenance of the floor coverings, drywall/ceiling repair, painting, cabinetry and tile work in kitchen and baths, bathroom fixtures, kitchen appliances, all mechanical systems including the air conditioning, furnace, water heater, water softener, sump pump, insulation, light fixtures and electrical wiring and plumbing, telephone wiring, fireplace and all doors, windows, stairway railings etc.

 

All exterior maintenance and repair including painting, siding and brick, gutters, the, chimney roof repairs/replacement, garage doors etc.

 

All structural and foundation repairs or maintenance, driveways, sidewalks & drainage issues

 

Typical Association Fees Related to this Property

Association fees with this type of property cover most if not all Landscape and hardscaping items like lawns, sprinkler systems, trees, shrubs, retaining walls, decks, patios, fences, water features, snow removal etc. along with the costs associated with neighborhood or development  amenities. None of the fee typically covers structural items with the individual home itself. Fees could range from fifty dollars each month to deal with neighborhood entry ways at the low end up to several hundred dollars each month based on features like neighborhood pools, clubhouses, tennis courts, lakes, golf courses as well as street or sidewalk repair and snow removal if privately owned

 

Pros of This Type of Property

Increased privacy and typically less contact with neighbors unless involved in neighborhood functions of your choosing. Greater ability to make aesthetic and other decisions that affect the exterior of your property although many neighborhoods have covenants that owners must follow along with city zoning requirements. Owners are not required to maintain a rainy-day reserve fund to cover the future house specific ongoing repairs and maintenance like painting or replacement of the roof when needed. Owner does not have to deal with routine landscape maintenance like mowing the lawn or shoveling/plowing snow themselves unless they choose to be involved with the Association that hires a contractor. Real estate taxes are generally lower than for a comparable single family house

 

Cons of This Type of Property

Typically less contact with neighbors unless involved in neighborhood functions. No mandated reserve fund to pull from when surprise repairs and expenses occur nor does a fund exist to cover planned repairs and maintenance. Expenses like roof repair, painting etc. are greater due to the loss of volume buying power. You must find, negotiate and supervise all contractors dealing with the exterior and interior of house itself.

 

Neighbors tend to pay less attention to activity occurring with neighbor’s homes like crime, vandalism etc.

 

Duplex, Triplex, Quadraplex – A duplex consists of two adjoining units; a triplex, three units per building; and a quadraplex, four units per building. These units can be one or multiple story units where each unit shares one or more common walls with adjoining units and each sits on its own separate but adjoining lot where each owner typically maintains the landscaping surrounding their individual unit. While the duplex and triplex are generally built side-by-side in a row, the units in a quadraplex are generally constructed back-to-back.

 

Owner owns the land the house is built on – Yes

Owner is Typically Responsible for Maintenance & Repair of the following Items: 100% of the lot and House except for the Party Walls (common walls) including all interior components like decorating, upgrades, repairs and maintenance of the floor coverings, drywall/ceiling repair, painting, cabinetry and tile work in kitchen and baths, bathroom fixtures, kitchen appliances, all mechanical systems including the air conditioning, furnace, water heater, water softener, sump pump, insulation, light fixtures and electrical wiring and plumbing, telephone wiring, fireplace and all doors, windows, stairway railings etc.

 

All exterior maintenance and repair including painting, siding and brick, gutters, the chimney, roof repairs/replacement, garage doors etc. along with landscape and hardscaping items like lawns, sprinkler systems, trees, shrubs, retaining walls, decks, patios, fences, water features, snow removal etc. for your 1/2, 1/3rd or 1/4th of the total structure.

 

All structural and foundation repairs or maintenance, driveways, sidewalks & drainage issues for your 1/2, 1/3rd or 1/4th of the total structure.

 

Typical Association Fees Related to this Property

Association fees with this type of property cover only any common walls or driveways. Fees could range from nothing up to one hundred dollars each month.

 

Pros of This Type of Property

Increased contact with neighbors. Depending on if covenants and restrictions exist there could be a greater ability to make aesthetic and other decisions that affect the exterior of your portion of the property although many structures are opting to have covenants that owners must follow along with city zoning requirements. Not typically required to maintain a rainy-day reserve fund to cover the future house specific ongoing repairs and maintenance like painting or replacement of the roof when needed.  Real estate taxes are generally lower than for a comparable single family house

 

Neighbors tend to pay more attention to activity occurring with neighbors homes like crime, vandalism etc.

 

Cons of This Type of Property

Typically more contact with neighbors. No mandated reserve fund to pull from when surprise repairs and expenses occur nor to cover planned repairs and maintenance. Expenses like roof repair, painting etc. could be greater due to the loss of volume buying power unless all owners decide to deal with these items at the same time. You must find, negotiate and supervise all contractors dealing with the exterior and interior of house itself. Owner does have to deal with routine landscape maintenance like mowing the lawn or shoveling/plowing snow themselves unless they choose to find, negotiate with and hire a contractor.

Patio Home –Locally most of these properties refer to a group of 6 or more residences comprised of groups of ‘paired patio homes’ which are a single-story, single-family unit that share a common wall with another adjoining single-story, single-family unit where each unit sits on its own separate but adjoining lot, although typically the landscaping surrounding the home is maintained by the Homeowners Association.  Depending on the local building market this style of property could also include 3 or more adjoining dwelling units where some or most units share more than one common wall with adjoining units. This type of property may be called a garden home, garden villa, courtyard home, club home or cottage etc.

 

Owner owns the land the house is built on – Yes

Owner is Typically Responsible for Maintenance & Repair of the following Items: 100% of the lot and House except for the Party Walls (common walls) including all interior components like decorating, upgrades, repairs and maintenance of the floor coverings, drywall/ceiling repair, painting, cabinetry and tile work in kitchen and baths, bathroom fixtures, kitchen appliances, all mechanical systems including the air conditioning, furnace, water heater, water softener, sump pump, insulation, light fixtures and electrical wiring and plumbing, telephone wiring, fireplace and all doors, windows, stairway railings etc.

 

All exterior landscape maintenance is almost always included as part of the HOA fees and often times repair/maintenance items including painting, siding and brick, gutters and the, chimney roof repairs/replacement, garage doors etc. are also covered as part of the fees although not always.

 

All structural and foundation repairs or maintenance, driveways, sidewalks & drainage issues are typically the owner’s responsibility.

 

Typical Association Fees Related to this Property

Association fees with this type of property cover most if not all Landscape and hardscaping items like lawns, sprinkler systems, trees, shrubs, retaining walls,  fences, water features, snow removal etc. along with costs associated with neighborhood or development  amenities. None of the fee typically covers unit specific patios or outside spaces, structural items with the individual home itself. Fees could range from fifty dollars each month to deal with neighborhood entry ways at the low end up to several hundred dollars each month based on features like neighborhood pools, clubhouses, tennis courts, lakes, golf courses as well as street or sidewalk repair and snow removal if privately owned

 

Pros of This Type of Property

Increased contact with neighbors. May or may not be required to maintain a rainy-day reserve fund to cover the future house specific ongoing repairs and maintenance like painting or replacement of the roof when needed. Excluding Unit specific outside spaces the Owner  typically does not have to deal with routine landscape maintenance like mowing the lawn or shoveling/plowing snow themselves unless the choose to be involved with the Association that hires a contractor. Real estate taxes are generally lower than for a comparable single family house

 

Neighbors excluding the adjoining neighbors tend to pay less attention to activity occurring with their neighbor’s homes regarding crime, vandalism etc.

 

Cons of This Type of Property

Typically more contact with neighbors. May or may not be have a reserve fund to pull from when surprise repairs and expenses occur nor to cover planned repairs and maintenance. Expenses like roof repair, painting etc. are greater due to the loss of volume buying power. You must find, negotiate and supervise all contractors dealing with the interior of house itself.

Townhouse – Typical townhouses have more than four units that are attached side-by-side in a row creating the illusion of one larger building. This configuration can also be referred to as a ‘row house’ although not typically. A townhouse has a door directly to the outside. Each Townhouse is single-family unit that shares a common ‘party wall’ with one or two adjoining, single-family units.  Many townhouses will have a one or two car private attached garage although with many townhouses the private garages are grouped into a separate structure, that’s disconnected from the main structure, where the space between the living space and the garage structure creates a backyard or courtyard area.  Each townhouse, and the garage when not attached, is on an individual lot shares one or more common ‘Party walls’ with adjoining units and garages (when not attached). Typically the landscaping surrounding the front and ends of the townhouses, even though part of each unit’s lot, is maintained by the Homeowners Association. Sometimes the HOA will also maintain the back yards or patios but typically each unit’s owner is responsible for the care and maintenance of their back yard.

 

Owner owns the land the house is built on – Yes

Owner is Typically Responsible for Maintenance & Repair of the following Items: 100% of the lot and House except for the Party Walls (common walls) including all interior components like decorating, upgrades, repairs and maintenance of the floor coverings, drywall/ceiling repair, painting, cabinetry and tile work in kitchen and baths, bathroom fixtures, kitchen appliances, all mechanical systems including the air conditioning, furnace, water heater, water softener, sump pump, insulation, light fixtures and electrical wiring and plumbing, telephone wiring, fireplace and all doors, windows, stairway railings etc.

 

All exterior landscape maintenance is almost always included as part of the HOA fees and often times repair/maintenance items including painting, siding and brick, gutters and the, chimney roof repairs/replacement, garage doors etc. are also covered as part of the fees although not always.

 

All structural and foundation repairs or maintenance, driveways, sidewalks & drainage issues are typically the owner’s responsibility.

 

Typical Association Fees Related to this Property

Association fees with this type of property cover most if not all Landscape and hardscaping items like lawns, sprinkler systems, trees, shrubs, retaining walls,  fences, water features, snow removal etc. along with costs associated with neighborhood or development  amenities. None of the fee typically covers unit specific patios or outside spaces, structural items with the individual home itself. Fees could range from fifty dollars each month to deal with neighborhood entry ways at the low end up to several hundred dollars each month based on features like neighborhood pools, clubhouses, tennis courts, lakes, golf courses as well as street or sidewalk repair and snow removal if privately owned

 

Pros of This Type of Property

Increased contact with neighbors. May or may not be required to maintain a rainy-day reserve fund to cover the future house specific ongoing repairs and maintenance like painting or replacement of the roof when needed. Excluding Unit specific outside spaces the Owner  typically does not have to deal with routine landscape maintenance like mowing the lawn or shoveling/plowing snow themselves unless the choose to be involved with the Association that hires a contractor. Real estate taxes are generally lower than for a comparable single family house

 

Neighbors, especially the adjoining neighbors, tend to pay more attention to activity occurring around them which can help reduce crime and vandalism etc.

 

Cons of This Type of Property

Typically more contact with neighbors. May or may not be have a reserve fund to pull from when surprise repairs and expenses occur nor to cover planned repairs and maintenance. Expenses like roof repair, painting etc. could be greater due to a loss of volume buying power if not part of the HOA fees. You must find, negotiate and supervise all contractors dealing with the interior of house itself and sometimes the exterior too.

Townhome Condos -Townhomes can visually appear to be the same as a townhouse… with a door to the outside. But a townhome could also be part of a midrise or high-rise building where the unit’s front door opens to a common hallway similar to an apartment.

 

Unlike a Townhouse, where the owner also owns the land their unit is on, with Townhomes the land is collectively owned by the home owner association. Some Townhomes, like townhouses, may have a private a one or two car attached garage although with many townhouses the garages are grouped into a separate structure. Typically when the garages are detached the space between the living unit and the garage structure become a backyard or courtyard area.

 

Like the townhome itself, any detached private garages are on land owned collective by the association vs a single owner. Typically all landscaping surrounding building(s) with townhomes is maintained by the Homeowners Association

Owner owns the land the house is built on – No

Owner is Typically Responsible for Maintenance & Repair of the following Items: 100% interior of the house including all interior components like decorating, upgrades, repairs and maintenance of the floor coverings, drywall/ceiling repair, painting, cabinetry and tile work in kitchen and baths, bathroom fixtures, kitchen appliances, all mechanical systems including the air conditioning, furnace, water heater, water softener, sump pump, insulation, light fixtures and electrical wiring and plumbing, telephone wiring, fireplace and all doors, windows, stairway railings etc.

 

All exterior landscape maintenance is included as part of the HOA fees along with the  repair/maintenance items including painting, siding and brick, gutters, the chimney roof repairs/replacement, garage doors etc. are also covered as part of the fees although not always.

 

All structural and foundation repairs or maintenance, driveways, sidewalks & drainage issues are typically the owner’s responsibility.

 

Typical Association Fees Related to this Property

Association fees with this type of property cover most if not all Landscape and hardscaping items like lawns, sprinkler systems, trees, shrubs, retaining walls,  fences, water features, snow removal etc. along with costs associated with neighborhood or development  amenities. None of the fee typically covers unit specific patios or outside spaces, structural items with the individual home itself. Fees could range from fifty dollars each month to deal with neighborhood entry ways at the low end up to several hundred dollars each month based on features like neighborhood pools, clubhouses, tennis courts, lakes, golf courses as well as street or sidewalk repair and snow removal if privately owned

 

Pros of This Type of Property

Increased contact with neighbors. May or may not be required to maintain a rainy-day reserve fund to cover the future house specific ongoing repairs and maintenance like painting or replacement of the roof when needed. Excluding Unit specific outside spaces the Owner  typically does not have to deal with routine landscape maintenance like mowing the lawn or shoveling/plowing snow themselves unless the choose to be involved with the Association that hires a contractor. Real estate taxes are generally lower than for a comparable single family house

 

Neighbors excluding the adjoining neighbors tend to pay less attention to activity occurring with their neighbor’s homes regarding crime, vandalism etc.

 

Cons of This Type of Property

Typically more contact with neighbors. May or may not be have a reserve fund to pull from when surprise repairs and expenses occur nor to cover planned repairs and maintenance. Expenses like roof repair, painting etc. are greater due to the loss of volume buying power. You must find, negotiate and supervise all contractors dealing with the interior of house itself.

Condo Apartments – Condo Apartments visually look very similar to traditional apartments only there is no collective landlord and you do not pay rent on the unit you own within the development. (Note: if you did not pay cash for the condo you typically will have a monthly mortgage payment to the lender that holds the mortgage on the condo.) Most condos do have an annual, quarterly or monthly maintenance fee that covers the maintenance and repair of the development’s common areas.

While Owners do not individually own any land associated with their unit but rather the ‘space’ occupied by your individual unit and a percentage of the common areas which would include any hallways, lobbies, party/exercise or meeting rooms and the land the development/community is built on. You also own the same percentage of any financial reserves used to maintain/repair the building. Each owner’s percentage of these common areas is typically based on their unit’s share of all of the unit’s total square feet.

Owner owns the land the house is built on – No

Owner is Responsible for Maintenance & Repair of the following Items: 100% of the unit including all interior components like decorating, upgrades, repairs and maintenance of the floor coverings, drywall/ceiling repair, painting, cabinetry and tile work in kitchen and baths, bathroom fixtures, kitchen appliances, all mechanical systems including the air conditioning, furnace, water heater, water softener, sump pump, insulation, light fixtures and electrical wiring and plumbing, telephone wiring, fireplace and all doors, windows, stairway railings etc.

 

All exterior landscape maintenance is almost always included as part of the HOA fees as well as repair/maintenance items including painting, siding and brick, gutters, the, chimney roof repairs/replacement, garage doors etc. are also covered as part of the fees.

 

All structural and foundation repairs or maintenance, driveways, sidewalks & drainage issues are typically the HOA’s responsibility.

 

Typical Association Fees Related to this Property

Association fees with this type of property cover all Landscape and hardscaping items like lawns, sprinkler systems, trees, shrubs, retaining walls, fences, water features, snow removal etc. along with costs associated with neighborhood or development amenities. None of the fee typically covers unit specific patios or outside spaces, structural items with the individual condo itself. Fees could range from one hundred dollars each month to deal with entry and common areas at the low end up to several hundred dollars each month based on features like neighborhood pools, clubhouses, tennis courts, lakes, golf courses as well as street or sidewalk repair and snow removal if privately owned

 

Pros of This Type of Property

Increased contact with neighbors. May or may not be required to maintain a rainy-day reserve fund to cover the future house specific ongoing repairs and maintenance like painting or replacement of the roof when needed. Excluding Unit specific outside spaces the Owner  typically does not have to deal with routine landscape maintenance like mowing the lawn or shoveling/plowing snow themselves unless the choose to be involved with the Association that hires a contractor. Real estate taxes are generally lower than for a comparable single family house

 

Neighbors excluding the adjoining neighbors tend to pay less attention to activity occurring with their neighbor’s homes regarding crime, vandalism etc.

 

Cons of This Type of Property

Typically more contact with neighbors. May or may not be have a reserve fund to pull from when surprise repairs and expenses occur nor to cover planned repairs and maintenance. Expenses like roof repair, painting etc. are greater due to the loss of volume buying power. You must find, negotiate and supervise all contractors dealing with the interior of house itself.

Converted Loft Condominium – Condo Loft Conversions are a particular type of Condo Apartments. These units were not originally built as residences but rather were typically industrial buildings or warehouses that were converted, at some point in time, to be condos. Typically these units have walls of windows, exposed brick or concrete, taller ceilings and other architectural elements that leverage parts of the building’s original construction.

Like Condo Apartments there is no collective landlord and you do not pay rent on the unit you own within the development. (Note: if you did not pay cash for the condo you typically will have a monthly mortgage payment to the lender that holds the mortgage on the condo.) Most condos do have an annual, quarterly or monthly maintenance fee that covers the maintenance and repair of the development’s common areas.

While Owners do not individually own any land associated with their unit but rather the ‘space’ occupied by your individual unit and a percentage of the common areas which would include any hallways, lobbies, party/exercise or meeting rooms and the land the development/community is built on. You also own the same percentage of any financial reserves used to maintain/repair the building. Each owner’s percentage of these common areas is typically based on their unit’s share of all of the unit’s total square feet.

Owner owns the land the house is built on – No

Owner is Typically Responsible for Maintenance & Repair of the following Items: 100% of the interior of the home (typically from the exterior wall studs inward, everything between the floor joists to ceiling joists plus usually all exterior windows and doors.)

All interior components like decorating, upgrades, repairs and maintenance of the floor coverings, drywall or ceiling repair, painting, Cabinetry and tile work in kitchen and baths, Bathroom fixtures, Kitchen Appliances, All mechanical systems including the air conditioning, furnace, water heater, water softener, sump pump, insulation, light fixtures and electrical wiring and plumbing, telephone wiring, fireplace and all doors and windows stairways railings etc.

 

All exterior landscape maintenance is always included as part of the HOA fees along with exterior or common area repair/maintenance items including painting, siding and brick, gutters and the, chimney roof repairs/replacement, garage doors etc.

 

All structural and foundation repairs or maintenance, driveways, sidewalks & drainage issues are usually the HOA responsibility however sometimes if the structural component is 100% ONLY serving the individual condo it may be up to the owner to address.

 

Typical Association Fees Related to this Property

Association fees with this type of property cover all Landscape and hardscaping items like lawns, sprinkler systems, trees, shrubs, retaining walls,  fences, water features,  etc. along with costs associated with neighborhood or development  amenities along with all common areas including any shared garages, parking lots, hallways, elevators etc., pools, clubhouses, tennis courts, lakes, golf courses as well as street or sidewalk repair and snow removal. Fees typically are based on the square feet/size and could range from one hundred dollars each month at the low end up to several hundred dollars each month based on the features within the development or neighborhood.

 

Pros of This Type of Property

Increased contact with neighbors. Few if any surprises since owners are required to maintain a rainy-day reserve fund to cover the future house specific ongoing repairs and maintenance like painting or replacement of the roof when needed. Excluding Unit specific outside spaces the Owner typically does not have to deal with routine landscape maintenance like mowing the lawn or shoveling/plowing snow themselves unless they choose to be involved with the Association that hires a contractor. Real estate taxes are generally lower than for a comparable single family house. Expenses like roof repair, common area painting etc. are typically less than what you would have on a conventional home due to volume buying power as part of the HOA fees.

 

Neighbors, especially the adjoining neighbors, tend to pay more attention to activity occurring around them which can help reduce crime and vandalism etc.

 

Cons of This Type of Property

Typically more contact with neighbors. Usually have to fund a reserve account to pull from when surprise repairs and expenses occur and to cover planned repairs and maintenance.